Driving Without Insurance Penalties By State


WRITTEN BY: Julia Matseikovich

UPDATED: JANUARY 27, 2023 | 3 MIN READ

If you’re one of the millions of Americans who drive without car insurance, you should be aware of the penalties by state. Every state has different laws and punishments for driving without insurance, so it’s important to know what to expect if caught. In some states, you may have to pay a fine; in others, you may lose your license or even go to jail. So before you hit the road sans insurance, make sure you know what could happen if you get pulled over in your state.

Driving without insurance: What You Need to Know

Driving without insurance is a serious offense that can lead to severe consequences. In many jurisdictions, it’s illegal to drive without proper car insurance coverage. This article will discuss the various aspects of driving without insurance, including legal repercussions and financial implications. We’ll also provide some tips on how you can avoid getting into trouble.

Legal Consequences of Driving Without Insurance

Driving without insurance is illegal in most states and jurisdictions. If you’re caught driving without proper insurance coverage, you could face substantial fines, driver’s license suspension or revocation, and even jail time. Depending on the severity of your offense and your state’s laws, you may even be required to pay restitution for any damages resulting from an accident.

Financial Implications of Driving Without Insurance

The financial implications of driving without insurance can be significant. If you’re involved in an accident and don’t have proper coverage, you could be held liable for the entire cost of repairs or medical bills incurred by all parties involved. This could mean thousands, if not tens of thousands, of dollars in out-of-pocket expenses for you to pay.

Consequences of driving without insurance

Overall, driving without insurance is not only illegal but can also cost you a significant amount of money if something were to happen on the road. It’s best to be prepared and get the coverage you need so you’re protected in any situation.

By investing in auto insurance, you could save yourself a lot of money and headache in the long run. For more information on auto insurance options, it’s best to speak with an experienced insurance broker who can help you find the best coverage for your individual needs.

It’s better to be safe than sorry – get the insurance coverage you need so that you can drive without worry!

Penalties for driving without insurance

  • SR-22 Requirement
  • Fines of up to $5,000
  • Suspended vehicle registration
  • Suspended driver’s license
  • Jail time
  • Mandatory community service
  • License and registration reinstatement fees
  • Vehicle impoundment

The decision to drive without insurance can have significant consequences. You will be financially responsible for any damages caused in an accident, and your car’s coverage may also become more expensive because you’re considered high-risk by auto insurers.

Penalties for driving without insurance per state

StateFirst OffenseRepeat OffenseLicense SuspensionOther Penalties
Alabama$500Up to $3,000First offense: 
Registration suspension with a $200 reinstatement fee
• Repeat offense: 
License and registration suspension with a $400 reinstatement fee
• 3-6 months in jail
• SR-22 certificate required for 1-3 years
Alaska$500 for each offense$500 for each offenseFirst offense:
90 days
• Repeat offense: 
1 year
• If at fault in an accident: 
3 years
• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years after license reinstatement
Arizona$500$750+• First offense: 
3 months
Repeat offense:
6-12 months
• SR-22 certificate required for two years
Arkansas$50 – $250$250-$1,000• Registration is suspended until the driver provides proof of insurance and pays a $20 fee.• Up to 1 year in jail
• SR-22 certificate required for three years
California$100 – $200, plus penalty assessments$200 – $500, plus penalty assessmentsn/a• SR-22 certificate is required for 3 years if the driver causes car accident while uninsured
• Car may be impounded
Colorado$500 minimum$1,000 minimumFirst offense: Suspension until the driver provides proof of insurance
Repeat offense: 
4-8 months
• The driver may be sentenced to 40 hours of community service
• Up to 1 year in jail after multiple offenses
• The SR-22 certificate is required for three years.
Connecticut$100 – $1,000$100 – $1,000First offense: 
1 month
• Repeat offense: 
6 months
• Up to 3 months in jail
• SR-22 certificate required for three years.
Delaware$1,500 – $2,000$3,000 – $4,000• 6 monthsn/a
District of Columbia$500 – $2,500$700 – $2,500• First offense: License suspended for 30 days
• Repeat offense: License suspended for 60 days

• Registration is suspended until proof of insurance provided
• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
Florida$150 license reinstatement fee$250 – $500 reinstatement fee• License and registration suspension for 3 years or until the driver has proof of insurance.
• SR-22 certificate required for three years

Georgia$200 – $1,000$200 – $1,000First offense:
60 days
• Repeat offense:
90 days
• Up to 1 year in jail
• SR-22 certificate required for three years
Hawaii$500$1,500-$5,000• First offense:
3 months
• Repeat offense:
1 year
• The driver may request to perform community service in lieu of a fine.
• Can perform up to 100 hours for the first offense or 275 hours for a repeat offense.

• SR-22 certificate required for three years
Idaho$75Up to $1,000• Suspension in place until driver provides proof of insurance• Up to 6 months in jail for a repeat offense

• SR-22 certificate is required for 1 year after first offense or 3 years after repeat offense
Illinois$500 – $1,000 (may be reduced to $100 if insurance is purchased prior to court date) Up to $1,000First offense:
License and registration suspended for 3 months
Repeat offense: License and registration suspended for 4 months
• The SR-22 certificate is required for 3 years
Indiana$250 license reinstatement feeSecond offense: $500 reinstatement fee
Repeat offense: $1,000 reinstatement fee
First offense:
90 days
Repeat offense:
1 year
• SR-22 certificate is required for 3 years after a first or second offense
• SR-22 certificate required for 5 years after third and subsequent offenses
Iowa$250 (community service may be served instead)$250 (community service may be served instead)N/A• SR-22 certificate is required for 2 years
• Vehicle may be impounded
Kansas$300 – $1,000$800 – $2,500• First and second offense will lead to suspension until proof of insurance is provided.
• Third offense will lead to revocation of driving privileges for 3 years.
• SR-22 certificate is required for 1 year
• Up to 6 months in jail
Kentucky$500 – $1,000$1,000 – $2,500• Registration is suspended for 1 year after the first and second offense, and for 2 years after every additional offense.
• License revoked for one year after the first offense, and 2 years after subsequent violations.
• Drivers may be imprisoned for 90 days after the first offense and up to 180 days for repeat offenses.
Louisiana$500 – $1,000$500 – $1,000• Registration is suspended until proof of valid insurance is given and fees are paid.• Vehicle may be impounded
• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
Maine$100 – $500$100 – $500• License and registration are suspended until the driver provides proof of insurance.• SR-22 certificate required or 3 years
MarylandUp to $1,000Up to $2,000• Registration suspended until proof of insurance is provided.• Up to 1 year in jail for first offense, and up to 2 years for repeat offense
MassachusettsUp to $1,000$500 – $5,000• First offense:
60 days
Repeat offense:
1 year
• Up to 1 year in jail
Michigan$200 – $500$200 – $500• License suspension for 30 days or until proof of insurance is submitted• Up to 1 year in jail
Minnesota$200 – $1,000
Community service may be performed in lieu of fines.
$200 – $3,000
Community service may be performed in lieu of fines.
• License is suspended for at least 30 days but no more than 1 year.
• Registration is suspended for up to 1 year or until proof of insurance is provided.
• Up to 1 year in jail after multiple offenses
• Vehicle may be impounded
Mississippi
$500, but can be reduced to $100 if proof of insurance is provided by court date.

$500, but can be reduced to $100 if proof of insurance is provided by court date.
• License suspended for 1 year or until proof of insurance is provided.• SR-22 certificate required for 3-5 years
MissouriNot to exceed $500Not to exceed $500• First offense:
License, plates, and registration are suspended until proof of insurance provided
Second offense:
90 days
• Third offense:
1 year
• Up to 15 days in jail
• SR-22 certificate required for 2 years
Montana$250 – $500Second offense: $350
Third or subsequent offense: $500
• License suspended for 90 days after second offense• Drivers may be imprisoned for 10 days after first and second offense or 6 months after third conviction.
• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
NebraskaLicense reinstatement fee: $50

Registration renewal fee: $50
License reinstatement fee: $50

Registration renewal fee: $50
• The license is suspended until the driver provides proof of insurance and pays all fees.• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
Nevada$250 – $1,000$500 – $1,000• After first or second offense, registration is suspended until proof of insurance is provided.
• After third offense, license is suspended for 30 days.
• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years if coverage lapses for more than 90 days
New Hampshire*License restoration fee: $100

Registration restoration fee: $25
License restoration fee: $100

Registration restoration fee: $25
• License and registration are suspended until the driver meets all requirements.• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
New Jersey$300- $1,000Up to $5,000First offense:
1 year
Repeat offense:
2 years
• Drivers may be ordered to perform up to 30 days of community service.
• Up to 14 days in prison after repeat offense
New MexicoNo more than $300No more than $1,000• Registration may be suspended• Drivers may be imprisoned for up to 90 days after the first offense and 6 months after a repeat offense
New York$150 – $1,500$150 – $1,500
• If without insurance for 90 days, registration and license are suspended for a time equal to insurance lapse.
• Drivers may be imprisoned for up to 15 days.
• Vehicle may be impounded.
North Carolina$50Second offense: $100
Third offense: $150
• Registration suspended for 30 daysN/A
North Dakota$150 – $1,000$300 – $5,000• License will be suspended until driver provides proof of insurance.• Up to 30 days in jail if second offense is committed within 1 year of the first.
• After second offense, car will be impounded until proof of insurance provided.
• SR-22 certificate required for 1 year
Ohio
Registration/plate reinstatement fees:
 $160 – $660
Registration/plate reinstatement fees: $160 – $660First offense: license suspended until all requirements met
• Second offense:
1-year suspension
Third offense:
2-year suspension
• SR-22 certificate required for 3-5 years
OklahomaUp to $250Up to $250• License suspended until proof of insurance is provided and all fees are paid.• Up to 30 days in jail
• Vehicle may be impounded
Oregon$130 – $1,000$130 – $1,000• License and registration will be suspended.• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
• Vehicle may be impounded
Pennsylvania$300$300
• License and registration suspended for 3 months
N/A
Rhode Island$100 – $500$500First offense:
license and registration suspended for 3 months
Repeat offense: license and registration suspended for 6 months
N/A
South Carolina$550 uninsured motorist fee
$100 – $200 and $5 for every day without insurance
$550 uninsured motorist fee
$200 and $5 for every day without insurance
• License and registration suspended until owner pays reinstatement fee and provides proof of coverage• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
South DakotaUp to $500Up to $500• License suspended for up to 1 year
• Registration is suspended until the driver provides proof of financial responsibility
• Up to 30 days in jail
• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
TennesseeUp to $300Up to $300• License suspended until driver re-takes license exam and provides proof of insurance.• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
Texas$175 – $350 plus a $250 surcharge for 3 years.$350 – $1,000 plus a $250 surcharge for 3 years.• After a repeat offense, the license and registration are suspended for two years or until the driver provides evidence of coverage.• After a repeat offense, the vehicle may be impounded for up 180 days, and the driver will be charged a fee of $15 per day.
• A SR-22 certificate is required for 2 years.
Utah$400
Courts may waive up to $300 of fines if owner obtains coverage prior to hearing.
$1,000
Courts may waive up to $300 of fines if owner obtains coverage prior to hearing.
• License and registration suspended until driver provides proof of insurance.• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
Vermont$250 – $500$250 – $500• The license is suspended until the driver provides proof of insurance.• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
VirginiaNo more than $500No more than $500• License, registration, and plates suspended until driver pays fee and provides proof of coverage.• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
WashingtonNo more than $287No more than $287N/A• SR-22 certificate may be required for 3 years if an uninsured driver causes an accident
West Virginia$200 – $5,000$200 – $5,000First and second offenses:
License and registration suspended for up to 30 days
Repeat offense:
License and registration suspended for 90 days
• Up to 1 year in jail
• Drivers on their first offense may avoid license suspension if they provide proof of coverage prior to the effective date
WisconsinUp to $500Up to $500
• License suspended until SR-22 is on file
• License and registration may be suspended for up to 3 years if you cause an accident while uninsured.
• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years
Wyoming$250 – $750$500 – $1,500• License and registration are suspended until the driver provides proof of coverage.• Up to 6 months in jail
• SR-22 certificate required for 3 years

Driving without an auto insurance policy after buying a car

The law is clear – driving without insurance is illegal, even if you just bought your car. However, there are grace periods for registering your car after buying it.

FAQs

Can someone drive my car if they are not on my insurance?

Most car insurance policies will cover drivers you’ve listed on the policy or anyone you allow to drive your vehicle.

What happens if you get caught driving without insurance?

The severity of penalties varies by state, but you can expect to lose your license and pay many fines. This loss of license and fines are the minimum; you could face jail time if it’s an accident or another violation like speeding (or even getting caught while intoxicated).

How much is the fine for driving without insurance?

Fines for driving without insurance vary by state. They also vary by the first offense or repeat offense. You could face fines anywhere between $100-$5,000.

Can your license be suspended for having no insurance?

Some states may suspend your license until you can prove current coverage. If you’re caught driving without insurance multiple times, you may face even harsher penalties, including a permanent loss of your license.

How many points is driving without insurance?

The penalty is five points for driving without insurance coverage.

Can you report someone who is driving around without insurance?

The best way to report an uninsured driver is through the police or DMV. The department of motor vehicles often has more significant concerns, so you must contact them first for your incident to be resolved as quickly and efficiently as possible.

What happens if property damage occurs and you don’t have at least liability insurance?

When you don’t have insurance, you are still responsible for the damage caused by the accident. You can be sued for the damages you caused and can be forced to pay by the court.

This could mean having future earnings garnished and personal property auctioned off to pay for the damage.

How are your insurance rates affected if you drive without insurance?

If you’re caught without the minimum coverage for insurance requirements for your state, you can expect to pay higher insurance premiums to the insurance company. You may be labeled as a high-risk driver, as you’re committing a traffic violation.

What are some reasons that an insurance company will consider you a high-risk driver?

High-risk is a designation reflecting on the driving record of one with multiple traffic violations, DUI, speeding, and various other violations and misdemeanors.

How to protect yourself before you get caught driving without insurance

While the consequences for driving without car insurance vary by state, they can be pretty severe. If caught driving without coverage, you may have to pay a fine, lose your license, or even go to jail. So before you take to the road uninsured, ensure you know what could happen in your state. To learn more about protecting yourself before you get caught driving without insurance, complete our form to see rates in your area now.